Blog: Dgrubs - Marimla at Mapali

 A kamayan is a communal-style Filipino feast, composed of colorful arrays of food that are usually served on banana leaves and eaten without utensils. / Bettina Makalintal for NPR

A kamayan is a communal-style Filipino feast, composed of colorful arrays of food that are usually served on banana leaves and eaten without utensils. / Bettina Makalintal for NPR

It’s hard to find Filipino food in Boston. I was pumped when KULINARYA, a brother sister team, was going to do a pop up at AURUM HAND PIES in Jamaica Plain. Note to self to go back another time top try the hand pies.

I met Leah from LEAH’S LIFE and Fiona from GOURMET PIGS for lunch. We started with the crab cakes: garlic lemongrass crab cake, greens, with a sweet bagoong dressing and fried tocino bits. I love these plates from OGUSKY CERAMICS – I have 4 pasta plates at home and can’t wait to get more!!

We were anxious to try a little bit of everything on the menu. Next up was the Pinoy Hash: Kamote (sweet potato) and lechon kawali (pork) hash, served with two eggs, and greens. A familiar dish, now we are speaking my language!

Next we sampled the pancakes: 3 ube halaya pancakes with a coconut cream sauce. Not too sweet which was nice. I find that in general, I don’t usually like coconut, but when I have it in Filipino food, I actually enjoy the flavor – perhaps because it isn’t super sweet.

We had the silog: garlic fried rice, Filipino-style pickles (daikon, radish, carrot) and your choice of Tocino (pork belly) or Tortang talong [vegetarian] (eggplant). We sampled a little of each. This was probably my favorite dish of them all.

If you’re interested in trying Filipino food (I highly recommend it), check out their FACEBOOK page for details.